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, the advancing america's networking and information technology research and development act of 2013. h.r. 967 is a good bipartisan bill which i was pleased to join mrs. lummis from wyoming and mr. hall from texas in introducing. h.r. 967 is largely based on a 2009 house-passed bill that was ntroduced by then-chairman gordon and ranking member hull. but this has some updates and reflects changing to the -- changes to the information and technology landscape as well as policy and management recommendations made by an outside panel of experts charged with evaluating nitr-d program. the program involves a collaboration of 15 federal resedge and development agencies, each contributing its own unique expertise and effort. to ensure that we make most effective use of our federal r&d resources and remain a leader in these fields. h.r. 967 requires that all 15 agencies come together to develop and periodically update a strategic plan for federal invest. s in -- investments in i.t. r&d. h.r. 967 will increase support, calls for increased support for large scale long-term interdisciplinary research in i
the impacts of extreme weather events, clean energy technologies and the threats of rising temperatures across the country. in contrast, we are not aware of any republican member who has spoken on the house floor about the dangers of climate change and the committee of jurisdiction is not even willing to hold a hearing to hear what the scientists and experts have to say about the issue. i have a message to house republicans, you can't make climate change go away by ignoring the problem. . . . the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentlewoman from washington rise? mrs. mcmorris rodgers: to address the house for one minute and to revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mrs. mcmorris rodgers: thank you, madam speaker. today, our hearts remain heavy -- our hearts are heavy for those who lost their lives on monday's unspeakable act of violence. for those who remain in critical condition, for the parents who lost their 8-year-old son, and for the families whose loved ones never came home from the boston marathon. while our sorrow is great, so, too, is o
is the next question. >> caller: the standards and technology. the agency tasked with buildis fail -- >> host three mike. do you have ollowup question? we undd whe you are going. >> caller: sample -- >> host: we'll see what the senator has to say about that. 9/11 conspiracy theories and different ways of looking at 9/11. what are your thoughts? >> guest: you know, the report that i go by is 9/11 commission frankly, many of the recommendations and assessments have become very relevant this week as we have dealt with a shocking tragedy in tbons. and, you know, actually given me this week an opportunity to reflect on how far we have come, for example, with homeland security in the ten years since that agency was created. as you noted, i'm on the home land security and government affairs committee, and, you know, they are hard at work. the joint terrorism task force through the fbi and homeland security and local officials in boston and trying to bring answers and bring ultimately the perpetrators to bear the full weight of justice in the united states. but, you know, back to the caller's questio
, but if you think about the success in reducing alcohol-impaired driving through technology, through sanctions, through education, through engineering, we can do the same thing about drugged driving. but the most important thing was atten the public, and i think that's what we've done. thank you, bob. >> we are almost out of time. but before asking the last question, we have a couple of housekeeping matters to take care of. first of all, i'd like to remind you about our upcoming luncheon events. on april 19th patrick donahoe, postmaster general, usps, will discuss challenges meeting the evolving demands of the nation's postal system. on may 7th, chris evert, tennis legend and publisher "tennis" magazine. and on june 3rd we will host the annual presentation of the gerald r. ford journalism awards. second, i would, with great feeling -- [laughter] in view of how you've covered your topic and you've generated so many questions, wow, i mean, i think -- i don't know if we keep track of a record and for handling them so well. i'd like to present you with the traditional npc mug. [applause] the scri
internet. hey, so where's the big project? ...huh. [ male announcer ] technology that makes you feel superhuman... where do i sign in? that's powerful. switch to fios and we'll triple your speeds for free with an upgrade to fios quantum. marvel's iron man 3, in theaters may 3rd. >>> welcome back. your weather first on this tuesday morning. we have clouds out there. it is a comfortably cool start. temps in the 50s. there are more clouds than our futurecast model is depicting. 60s by 9:00. we'll head toward lunch time. by then i think we'll see a little bit of sun starting to develop with temperatures upper 60s to around 70. your afternoon temperatures today should make it into the low to mid-70s. not too bad at all. >>> good morning, everybody. after this past weekend's series against the braves, you had to ask yourself, is this nationals team a world series contender after getting outscored 18-5. well thank goodness for the miami marlins because apparently they're the nats get well cure. ryan zimmerman, the rest of the mlb wearing number 42 to honor jackie robinson. no home runs comi
. i absolutely want to dance again. >> reporter: this doctor says modern prosthetic technology is so advanced, she will. so, doctor, a lot of victims are telling me, you know what, i will walk again. they can? >> they can. if they were walking before they had their amputation, we can have them walk again. much depends on the level of their amputation. and all of it depends on what their goals and objectives are. >> reporter: and we have seen just how impressive these prosthetics can be. our own diane sawyer, interviewed amy mullens, both her legs amputated as a young girl. she later not only competed in the paralympics, and became a model. whether dancing or running, the doctor says, modern prosthetic technology is so advanced, adrianne will get back on that dance floor. >> i just want people to know that you can come out of a situation that may seem like the end of the world and come out stronger. >> reporter: this dancer is determined, like the rest of the city, to get back on her feet again. gio benitez, abc news, boston. >> hers is just one of the many stories i know we are going
behind. and these are new technologies. they are great innovations that are coming down the pike. we need to address those. we need to move forward. i came here to talk about reasonable fiscal solutions. we just heard a debate, a good debate about the effects of sequestration. we know we have challenges. on both sides of the aisle there is a sense of purpose to change the trajectory of this debt. we are spending -- we are borrowing 40 cents of every dollar we spend. we have a national debt that is almost equal to our gross domestic product. we have interest payments that are the third-highest payment that we make here, and that's at a time of record-low interest rates. this is unsustainable, and it needs to be addressed but i think it needs to be addressed responsibly. and so, like many of you, i have my own personal passions, and they involve senior citizens, making sure that we provide them with a secure future. but also a secure future for future senio senior citizens. veterans care deeply about the condition of veterans benefits and what we're going to do to reward and thank -- truly
technology, it's the only way to track them. if we invested what we should've in the air traffic system, we would have -- may not solve all of chuck's problems, but a much faster, flowing system. >> by the way, if you modernize it, you can cut back on some of the workforce permanently and save money there. that's the other issue. it's very labor intensive because of the issue that steve just described. >> before we go to break, the president is dining tonight with members of the senate, all women, isn't that nice? >> that's great. >> chuck todd, thank you. we'll see you at 9:00 on the "daily rundown." >> i'm surprised that didn't get ugly just then. >> right. >> that's great. >> we went to counseling. >>> up next, steve rattner has charts on signs of a spring slowdown. more "morning joe" when we come back. but i wondered what a i tcustomer thought? is great, hi nia... nice to meet you nia, i'm mike. what do you drive? i have a ford explorer, i love my car. and you're treating it well? yes i am. there are a lot of places you could take your explorer for service, why do you bring it back to t
time, you could argue that it means a decrease in personnel. because you're using technology, using cameras to replace, you know, eyeballs. but i don't think we've come to that determination. we're down -- the police department is down 6,000 police officers than where we were 11 years ago. so we've already sort of paid the price. and we're using to a certain extent technology to plug the gaps. we're increasing the number of cameras that we have. one of the things that we're doing, we had it in motion prior to the boston marathon. but we want to increase the number of mobile cameras that we have so we can put them up at events and then move them to other events. along our marathon route, we have 220 cameras. but most of them are on bridges. we want to increase at least the public sector cameras that we have along that route. >> all right. new york city police commissioner, ray kelly, thank you very much. it's always good to see you. >> thank you for the great job you keep doing for the city. >> thank you. >>> a new book on afghanistan that's not so good. president hamid karzai had to
that will make it more appealing to our readers. >> guest: was helpful as that the technology, take a smart phone or a tablet and you literally wavered over the code in the book and you get a video of the atkins case of many of the other cases we've covered. >> guest: one o of the cases recovered and fought with you can at the death penalty for juveniles. somebody who is under 18. this case involved a 17 year old who seem to be on a -- took an elderly woman out on a bridge, pushed her off. she drowned her and they pick him up at his high school the next day, and within hours he had a cheerful confession to police. and we describe is in the book but when you put the phone over the code, you can see the confession yourself. >> host: i thought the codes were neat way to just kind of come in almost takes the reader to even more into the book. and i was wondering what was the thought behind that? is this the direction in which books are going to be headed, especially nonfiction? it does create a great opportunity to just really grab your readers. >> guest: martin will explain this. i didn't understand
. these assault weapons on our streets, near schools, the only technology that should be near a child in a school should be a computer, not a gun. special those that have the magazines that only belong on the battlefield of our country and could have been purchased without criminal background checks. you have to be able to work in a bipartisan fashion to put together a coalition that can successfully pass that kind of legislation. >> but in terms of the political tactics that are not working in washington. is there something you could dow to prevent the stalling tactics. >> i would like to follow-up if i could. most people know my background and a few years back -- well, more than a few years back my cousin brian was gunned down where we grew up. aknow what it is like to have family member killed by gun violence. i think that far too many families know that feeling. there is a lot of families out there suffering from that loss. we met with some last night at a orum over in dorchester. i think if those member opposite the u.s. senate that rejected that proposal had a sense of what u.s. was like --
records are prime targets for attackers to steal. according to the information technology industry council, 18 adults become victims to cybercrime, including identity campaigns ishing every second. this adds up to 1 1/2 million cybercrime victims each day. cyberattacks present a very real and dangerous threat to the united states, however the government currently
in a competitive market, we win. we have the best workers. we have the best technology. we have freedom. we have the rule of law. we need to do commonsense tax reform for the purposes of putting us in a position where we can create the jobs today and for generations to come because we will then create a fair, level playing field that allows us to start building things in america, allows us to put people to work for generations to come. so i appreciate my good friend from oklahoma bringing this issue to the forefront and having this conversation tonight. and i know he's bringing forth a copy of the code and the regulations and all you have to do is look at that colossal piece of paper or reams of paper, books of paper, 70,000 pages of statutory tax and regulation. we in america can do better. we as house republicans demand us to do better, and we will do better under the leadership that house republicans are doing in the ways and means committee and as a conference to make sure that we end up with a code that is simple, fair and no longer is riddled with loopholes, big government handouts, big go
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13